Dental Website Design Elements In Dentist Websites That Increase Practice Productivity

Dentist websites are generally created with the purpose of increasing the number of patients in an oral care expert’s practice. This isn’t the only goal an effective dental website design can accomplish. Certain features can be added into the online home that benefit the office staff, making the practice more productive, and therefore, more profitable.

Information On Procedures And Techniques

Adding valuable information about technologies and services provided at a practice can greatly improve the efficiency of a practice. Patients can go to the dentist websites to educate themselves on various procedures. This saves office staff from having to copy and hand out sets of information. Clients arrive at their appointment with an understanding of the procedures they are interested in. Best of all, they can look at this information on dentist websites in the comfort of their own homes when it is convenient.

If this is used wisely, this same information makes a priceless marketing tool for both existing and new patients. They can discover treatments they may have been unaware of or simply didn’t know were offered. New clients can log on to the site to see if you offer all of the services they are looking for. You can take this further by adding articles and short videos to the home page of your dental website design that feature a different procedure each month to increase the attention certain cosmetic treatments receive. Promotional newsletters can provide this information to current and prospective patients as well.

Before And After Care Information

Information on the preparation and after care of various procedures can become a valuable component of your dental website design. You can recommend patients go online for a copy of their instructions, giving them easier access to the information they need. Clients can use this portion of the site to discover what goes into a procedure and which technique might be best for them. Many practices find this becomes a priceless component because it decreases their workload so they can spend more time on customer service. Some offices have supplied their waiting rooms with a computer so patients can look at the information while waiting for their appointment time.

Forms

The office staff often finds that patient forms added to dentist websites can save a significant amount of time. With a good system, they can download the completed forms directly into their office systems, making these systems far more efficient. They can spend more time on things like dental x-rays and can have a client’s previous records sent into the office so everything is ready to go when it is time for the appointment.

Oral care professionals often notice including these forms in their dental website design improves the ratio between online visitors and those who actually make an appointment. This makes first time appointments easier and more convenient. Online visitors frequently feel more compelled to make an appointment rather than checking out your competition.

These aren’t the only dental website design elements that can be added into dentist websites to increase office productivity and profits gained from a solid online presence. These elements work to promote your practice 24/7 while easing the workload on office staff to make the entire practice more efficient and successful. The more functions included in online marketing the better the ROI will be.

Christine O’Kelly writes for the experts in dentist websites at Officite. This is a dental marketing and dental website design company with more than 3,600 satisfied customers.

Shelburne Farms (1886) – Farm Barn (1888-90) – detail
Website Design Practice
Image by origamidon
Shelburne, Vermont USA • Shelburne Farms is one of the finest examples in the nation of a late 19th – 20th Century model farm and country estate. Created for Dr. William Seward and Lila Vanderbilt Webb, the estate is noted for its exemplary agricultural, architectural, and landscape design achievements. – National Historic Landmark plaque.

A farm and country estate constructed from c.1886 to 1915, Shelburne Farms consists of approximately 1,300 acres of designed and agricultural landscape and significant wood-framed and masonry buildings representative of a combination of Shingle and Queen Anne styles. Four major buildings and 78 secondary buildings, structures, and sites are situated in functional groupings between broad expanses of cleared agricultural fields with rolling hills and isolated softwood plantations, hardwood and softwood forests, gardens, and rocky lakeshore. Eleven and a half miles of curvilinear interior roads and eight miles of walking trails traverse the varied farm and estate landscape, connect the resources, and provide views and vistas of Lake Champlain and the Adirondack Mountains to the west and the Green Mountains to the east. Shelburne Farms lies at elevations between approximately 95 feet and 392 feet a.m.s.l. [above mean sea level]. Lone Tree Hill, the highest point on the property, rises from the center of the property and features panoramic views over the fields and forests to the lake and mountain ranges – From the Landmark Nomination form.

Shelburne Farms is a nonprofit environmental education center and National Historic Landmark on the shores of Lake Champlain in Shelburne, Vermont. It is also one of the principal concert sites for the Vermont Mozart Festival.

Shelburne Farms was created in 1886 by Dr. William Seward Webb and Eliza Vanderbilt Webb as a model agricultural estate. They commissioned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted [and forester Gifford Pinchot,] to guide the layout of 3,800 acres (15 km2) of farm, field and forest, and New York architect Robert Henderson Robertson, to design the buildings. Shelburne Farms was incorporated as a nonprofit educational facility in 1972. Nearly 400 acres (1.6 km2) of sustainably managed woodlands received Green Certification from the Forest Stewardship Council in 1998.

The Shelburne Farms grass-based dairy supports a herd of 125 purebred, registered Brown Swiss cows. Their milk is made into an award-winning farmhouse cheddar cheese. The farm serves as an educational resource by practicing rural land use that is environmentally, economically and culturally sustainable. Visitors may enjoy the walking trails, children’s farmyard, inn, restaurant, property tours and special events. – From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

☞ On August 11, 1980, this Historic District was added to the National Register of Historic Places (#80000330).

☞ On January 3, 2001, the National Park Service designated this Historic District a National Historic Landmark (#80000330), making it the newest Landmark in Vermont.

National Historic Landmarks are nationally significant historic places designated by the Secretary of the Interior because they possess exceptional value or quality in illustrating or interpreting the heritage of the United States. Today, fewer than 2,500 historic places bear this national distinction. – [And one of only 17 in Vermont.] – Working with citizens throughout the nation, the National Historic Landmarks Program draws upon the expertise of National Park Service staff who work to nominate new landmarks and provide assistance to existing landmarks.

National Historic Landmarks are exceptional places. They form a common bond between all Americans. While there are many historic places across the nation, only a small number have meaning to all Americans — these we call our National Historic Landmarks. – from the National Park Service.

• More info: The GeoHack for 44°23′31.69″N 73°15′26.04″W. ∞ Here are the websites for Shelburne Farms, and The Inn at Shelburne Farms. ∞ Here’s a nice aerial shot from the Find a Museum page by folks at The Vermont Museum and Gallery Alliance.
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In July, 2010, I started a project to visit and document all seventeen Landmarks in Vermont. Here they are (in order of designation by the National Park Service):

[01] 09/22/60 – JUSTIN S. MORRILL HOMESTEAD, Strafford, Orange County
[02] 01/28/64 – TICONDEROGA (Side-paddle-wheel Lakeboat), Shelburne, Chittenden County
[03] 06/23/65 – CALVIN COOLIDGE HOMESTEAD DISTRICT, Plymouth Notch, Windsor County
[04] 12/21/65 – EMMA WILLARD HOUSE, Middlebury, Addison County
[05] 11/13/66 – ROBBINS AND LAWRENCE ARMORY AND MACHINE SHOP, Windsor, Windsor County
[06] 06/11/67 – GEORGE PERKINS MARSH BOYHOOD HOME, Woodstock, Windsor County
[07] 05/23/68 – ROBERT FROST FARM, Ripton, Addison County
[08] 12/30/70 – VERMONT STATEHOUSE, Montpelier, Washington County
[09] 11/28/72 – MOUNT INDEPENDENCE, Orwell, Addison County
[10] 12/20/89 – STELLAFANE OBSERVATORY, Springfield, Windsor County
[11] 11/04/93 – NAULAKHA (Rudyard Kipling House), Dummerston, Windham County
[12] 06/19/96 – OLD ROUND CHURCH, Richmond, Chittenden County
[13] 06/19/96 – ST. JOHNSBURY ATHENAEUM, St. Johnsbury, Caledonia County
[14] 12/09/97 – ROKEBY, Ferrisburgh, Addison County
[15] 05/16/00 – ROCKINGHAM MEETING HOUSE, Windham County
[16] 05/16/00 – SOCIALIST LABOR PARTY HALL, Barre, Washington County
[17] 01/03/01 – SHELBURNE FARMS, Shelburne, Chittenden County
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☞ More photos of this and other National Historical Landmarks.

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